Pfizer unit Hospira raised the price of a 10-pack of naloxone from $62.29 in 2012 to $142.49 this year, and Kaleo raised the price of its naloxone 2-pack auto-injector from $690 in 2014 to $4,500 this year, putting the life-saving drugs out of reach for many people who overdose on opioids. Kaleo executive Mark Herzog said patient assistance programs increase access, but patients end up paying the price later in the form of higher premiums, said Ravi Gupta, co-author of an opinion piece in The New England Journal of Medicine.